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Trimble introduces range of wireless IoT sensors for water monitoring

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The IoT sensors enable utilities to monitor areas of their network that would have been cost prohibitive to reach in the past

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The sensors use LoRa technology to measure water such as rainfall volume
The sensors use LoRa technology to measure water such as rainfall volume
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Water managers have the ability to wirelessly report data at resolutions down to five minute intervals

Utilities can deploy the sensors to address challenges such as drought and storm events

Trimble’s water division has unveiled a new portfolio of wireless, battery-powered sensors for remote water monitoring applications.

 

The Telog 41 series of Internet of Things (IoT) sensors use, low-power, long-range (LoRa technology) wireless communications to measure and monitor water, wastewater and groundwater systems including water pressures, flows, levels and rainfall volumes.

 

The series includes five new wireless IoT sensors that monitor key measurements of water. Data is communicated using LoRaWAN technology to Telog software at intervals between five minutes and 24 hours. Using Telog cloud-hosted or on-premise software, utility companies have full access to Telog 41 series monitoring data, including alerts and alarms and advanced analytics and reporting, the company said.

 

The sensors extend across a utilities existing monitoring programmes for better tracking, measurement and reporting of water usage, sanitary and combined-sewer overflows (CSO/SSO) and flooding, leakage and non-revenue water (NRW). The sensors can be deployed to enable utilities to address many of the significant challenges they are facing due to drought and water shortages, storm events and flooding, budget constraints and environmental regulations, Trimble stated.

 

“The IoT for water enables a step change in operational efficiency, compliance and sustainability for the water industry,” said Adrian Newcombe, business director of Trimble’s Telog solutions. “With the Telog 41 Series of IoT sensors, utilities now have the ability to monitor areas of their network that would have been cost prohibitive to reach in the past. And with the ability to wirelessly report data at resolutions down to five minute intervals, water managers have much deeper visibility into their operations.

 

“This is essential for enabling utilities to transform how they operate their distribution and collection networks,” he added.

 

Key common features of the Telog 41 series sensors include:

  • Low cost relative to traditional cellular remote monitoring products, allowing utilities to deploy sensors in higher numbers and to distribute them throughout their distribution and collection networks
  • LoRaWAN IoT wireless technology ensuring that sensors call in at high frequency while still retaining long battery life (four- to seven years)
  • Configurable alerts and alarms for automated event detection and reporting
  • Powered by a single, user-replaceable C-size lithium battery; no need for on-site power and simple to maintain
  • Small size, rugged and easy to install
  • Compatible with Telog cloud-hosted and on-premise software

 

The Telog 41 Series is expected to be available in the fourth quarter of 2016.

 

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