You are viewing 1 of 3 articles without an email address.


All our articles are free to read, but complete your details for free access to full site!

Already a Member?
Login Join us now

Public-private cooperation is the key to a sustainable future

New report sets out a raft of actions for both the private and public sectors as well as joint activity they should undertake

LinkedIn Twitter Facebook
By 2050, city dwellers are expected to account for more than two-thirds of the population
By 2050, city dwellers are expected to account for more than two-thirds of the population
Sharelines

Cities need "vital cooperation between the public and private sectors, as well as wider civil society"

Sixty per cent of urban growth is attributed to natural population increase

“Best-in-class” public-private co-operation is required to achieve sustainable urban development, says the World Economic Forum (WEF).

 

WEF’s comments follow the release of findings from its emerging report, Harnessing Public-Private Cooperation to Deliver the New Urban Agenda. The report’s aim is to drive the implementation of sustainable urban development and housing following the agreement of the New Urban Agenda at the Habitat III conference, which is taking place this week.

 

“The world is experiencing an unprecedented transition from predominantly rural to chiefly urban living. In 1950, a third of the world’s population lived in cities; today, the proportion has already reached more than half,” stated said Alice Charles, lead, urban development, World Economic Forum.

 

She adds: “By 2050, city dwellers are expected to account for more than two-thirds of the world’s population. If our cities are to be sustainably developed, in line with the Sustainable Development Goals and New Urban Agenda, they will need to enable vital cooperation between the public and private sectors, as well as wider civil society, to create the financial and delivery models required to achieve sustainable development.”


The global rise of cities has been unprecedented. According to the United Nations, 60 per cent of urban growth is attributed to natural population increase, while 40 per cent is due to migration of rural to urban and international migration.

To respond to urbanisation and lead the world towards sustainable urban development, the UN has been conducting a global conference, Habitat III, in Quito, Ecuador, which concludes today. The objectives are to secure renewed political commitment for sustainable urban development, assess the accomplishments of Habitat II (Istanbul, Turkey, 1996) and address poverty and emerging challenges.

 

The outcome of the conference will be a concise, focused, forward-looking and action-oriented document, referred to as the New Urban Agenda, which will set new global priorities on urbanisation for the next two decades.

Joan Clos, executive director and under secretary-general, UN-Habitat, said: The United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development is a unique opportunity to set out urban strategies that will integrate all facets of sustainable development to promote equity, welfare and shared prosperity, and contribute to maximising the benefits of good urbanisation.”

The World Economic Forum has been actively engaged with UN Habitat to strengthen the implementation of the New Urban Agenda. The Forum, in its emerging report, Harnessing Public-Private Cooperation to Deliver the New Urban Agenda, highlights the role of the private sector in the delivery of urban infrastructure and services in all aspects of the urban value chain. These include policy-making, planning, design, implementation, operation and maintenance, and monitoring, as well as the financing of urban service delivery.

 

The report sets out a number of actions for both the public and private sectors:

 

Public sector actions

  • Engaging the private sector early in the planning and design process
  • Adopting a life-cycle approach
  • Building on circular and sharing economy concepts
  • Articulating clear policies for public-private cooperation
  • Demonstrating a strong, stable and visible political commitment
  • Developing the appropriate legal and regulatory framework
  • Empowering city leadership and strengthening institutional frameworks and capacity
  • Transparent and flexible procurement frameworks
  • Establishing reliable dispute-resolution mechanism

Private sector actions

  • Adopting a proactive approach
  • Taking a realistic view of urban service delivery projects
  • Engaging with local communities for long-term support
  • Building public-private cooperation that withstands testing times
  • Extending partnerships beyond the obvious

Integrated actions

  • Building mutual trust and integrity
  • Embracing civil society
  • Leveraging technology
  • Promoting urban innovations

 

 

If you liked this, you might be interested in reading the following:

 

Shaping cities for a better world

Navigating a course through urban transformation

smartcitiesworld.net/connectivity/connectivity/shaping-cities-for-a-better-world--

 

Reforms vital for delivery of India’s smart cities project

20 cities given funding to start the quest to be smart

smartcitiesworld.net/connectivity/connectivity/reforms-vital-for-delivery-of-indias-smart-cities-project

 

Smart seven will all benefit from the Smart City Challenge

All seven finalist cities in the Department of Transport’s challenge will be able to take advantage of continued collaboration with government and private sector partners

smartcitiesworld.net/news/news/smart-seven-will-all-benefit-from-the-smart-city-challenge-659

LinkedIn Twitter Facebook