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Buying into the Internet of Everything

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qBiq is a wireless sensor that monitors and collects data and can internet-enable any object, appliance and living or office space

 

 
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The one-inch cubes connect, monitor and report data on any object or surface
The one-inch cubes connect, monitor and report data on any object or surface
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Each qBiq has a unique QR code and web address that collects and displays datasets

Data that qBiq produces is open source so insights gained are immediately actionable

Ontario-based technology company Ubiqweus is launching a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign for what it claims is the world’s first Internet of Everything device.

 

qBiq is a wireless sensor that monitors and collects data from anything, at any time. Its developers say it can internet-enable any object, appliance and living or office space at the touch of a button, sending data directly to a user’s smartphone or tablet for analysis using the freely available qBiq mobile application.

 

The Kickstarter campaign features the first four models of the qBiq, including qBiq Temp (for measuring and monitoring temperature), qBiq Feel (for measuring and monitoring humidity), qBiq Glow (for measuring and monitoring light intensity), and qBiq Move (for measuring and monitoring motion). With nearly infinite use cases, the smart gadget allows anyone to keep tabs on their possessions and the environment in their homes, offices, businesses, and in almost every other aspect of their lives.

 

"IoT is often built directly into devices, like internet-connected thermostats, cars, and even toasters, but what if you could turn any object or surface into an IoT device with that functionality but without any complexity and high cost?” said Sean Stephens, co-founder, Ubiqweus.

 

He added: “The qBiq is a disruptive IoT device because it’s easy-to-use, affordable, and it can be used almost anywhere or for anything. With qBiq, anyone can monitor and access real-time data from any object in their home or office, or keep tabs on elements in their indoor and outdoor environments with ease."

 

The cost of qBiq starts at around $30 per unit. With extensive battery life, the sensor transmits data on any object or space continually for more than six months depending on usage. It is fully rechargeable via a USB connection to any computer, solar-based charger, or wall socket.

 

Each qBiq has a unique QR code and website address that collects and displays datasets, providing real-time information that’s accessible and shareable. The data that qBiq produces is open source, meaning that the insights gleaned are immediately actionable and can be used for mobile application or software development.

 

Key features of the qBiq include:

  • wi-fi-enabled, sensor-based IoT device that measures and records data
  • One-inch cubic body
  • Real-time transfer and analysis of data
  • A lightweight, durable shell
  • Unique QR code and website address for each device
  • Open source functionality
  • Rechargeable battery via USB connection
  • Minimum six-month battery life

Those who wants to check out qBiq on Kickstarter at www.kickstarter.com/projects/qbiq/qbiq-the-internet-of-everything-smart-gadget

 

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