Low emissions delivery

Ford has unveiled its new plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) Transit Custom van, designed to help improve local air quality by running solely on electric power

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A significant contributor to poor air quality, freight is beginning to clean up its act
A significant contributor to poor air quality, freight is beginning to clean up its act

The freight industry is a significant contributor to poor air quality, so the launch of Daimler’s all-electric, zero emissions, zero noise, truck series which we reported on this week, gets a thumbs-up from us.

 

Due to its stealthy noiselessness, I naturally worry about engrossed phone users who walk our streets intently looking at nothing but their screens. Maybe someone should develop an app that alerts them to the presence of any object (organic or otherwise) likely to cause a collision: an autonomous vehicle early warning system that can be adapted for psychologically blinkered persons either on foot or on a bike. Now there’s a new business opportunity, so go forth and crowd-fund.

 

I digress.

 

UPS has become the first commercial user of Daimler’s all-electric truck, already taking delivery of three Fuso eCanter light duty trucks to be used at several locations.

 

These battery powered vehicles claim a drive charge of 62 miles and Daimler says the truck will save UPS $1,000 for every 6,000 miles it travels compared to a conventional diesel. The vehicle manufacturer is also providing eight Fuso eCanters to four New York non-profit groups.

 

Meanwhile across the pond, Ford has unveiled its new plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) Transit Custom van, designed to help improve local air quality by running solely on electric power for the majority of city trips. Ford is readying 20 of these vehicles for a 12-month customer trial in London that begins later this year.

 

The Cleaner Air for London trial will see TfL, Metropolitan Police, British Gas and other high-profile organisations use one or more of the vans as part of their daily operations. Data from the trial will be used to inform London’s LoCITY programme.

 

To keep you in the loop, LoCITY is a structured, collaborative programme that brings together the full gamut of stakeholders needed to stimulate the uptake of low emission commercial vehicles.

Its objectives are as follows:

  • Improve London’s air quality
  • Help meet London’s targets on reducing carbon dioxide emissions
  • Prepare the freight and fleet industry for the implementation of London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) that comes into play in 2020.
  • Support public and private fleets to upgrade to cleaner vehicles and alternative fuels.

Commercial vehicles in London make 280,000 journeys on a typical weekday, travelling a total distance of eight million miles (13 million kilometres). Vans represent three quarters of peak freight traffic, with more than 7,000 vehicles per hour driving at peak times in Central London alone.

The development of the 20 Transit Custom fleet trial vehicles has been supported by a £4.7 million grant from the UK Government-funded Advanced Propulsion Centre.

 

The Transit Custom PHEV van is part of Ford’s global electrification commitment. The automaker and mobility company has invested $4.5 billion to make electric vehicles and it plans to introduce 13 new-electrified vehicles globally in the next five years, including an all-electric small SUV to be sold in Europe, North America and Asia.

 

It is also undertaking a joint project with Deutsche Post DHL Group to produce electric delivery vans (e-vans), becoming Europe’s largest manufacturer of medium-sized e-vans with 2,500 vehicles built by the end of 2018. It has also announced an ambitious China electrification strategy and confirmed that 70 per cent of all Ford vehicles sold in China will have electrified powertrain options by 2025.

White van man is about to become green.

 

Melony Rocque

Executive editor

 

 

 

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