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A shift in energy

Yes, ladies and gentleman the UK has called time on a century of reliance on fossil fuels

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Smart energy is slap bang in the middle of the UK government's industrial strategy
Smart energy is slap bang in the middle of the UK government's industrial strategy

It’s amazing isn’t it how some news items that are significant just seem to float under the radar. I felt the three parents DNA child development at the end of last year was seismic, no one I knew seemed to bat an eyelid.

However, this week another great leap forward has been announced. Yes, ladies and gentleman the UK has called time on a century of reliance on fossil fuels. The UK government has put renewables, smart grids, solar, wind power, electric vehicles and batteries slap bang in the middle of its industrial strategy.

 

According to reports, renewables in the UK are responsible for a quarter of the UK’s energy needs. The inconstancy of wind and solar sources has always been the issue for the National Grid. However, batteries have been singled out as the way to tame these wonderful, yet wayward natural resources.

 

Under the rather touchingly named Faraday Challenge (Michael Faraday (1791 – 1867) was the British scientist who was: a) the first to produce a current from an electric field; b) invented the first electric motor and dynamo; c) demonstrated the relationship between electricity and chemical bonding; d) discovered the effect of magnetism on light; e) discovered and named diamagnetism), the UK government has committed to a £246m investment into battery technology in a bid to position the UK as a world leader in their design, development and manufacture. This also includes a £45m competition, led by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), to set up a centre for battery research to make them more accessible and affordable.

The investment in battery technology looks set to bring down energy bills, power new skills and jobs as the attendant infrastructure is established.

 

Over the past decade, we’ve all heard/read the blue sky thinking around disruptions to traditional energy supply, and its knock on effect to other industries. Now, we’re all going to be witnesses to this revolution that will happen fast, changing the habits of a lifetime.

 

Melony Rocque

Executive editor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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